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WELD FLOWER

F.5 LINUM USITATISSIMUM (LINACAEAE)

Flax fibers are taken from the stem of the plant and are two to three times as strong as those of cotton. Europe and North America depended on flax for vegetable-based cloth until the 19th century when cotton overtook flax as the most common plant used for making clothing. The plant is highly-renewable and requires no chemicals to cultivate or process.

MINERALS

F.2 MAGNETITE (IRON OXIDE - FE3O4)

Magnatite is the most magnetic of all the naturally-occuring minerals on Earth. It is how humans first discovered the property of magnetism in ancient times.

POST-CONSUMER RECYCLED PLASTIC

Sourced: United States

F.3 POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE (PET)

Recycling plastic decreases our dependence on oil as a raw material source. and curbs the amount of trash being dumped, thereby prolonging landfill life. Reducing the toxic emission from the constant flow of landfill incinerators lessens the advance of global warming.

SHELLAC RESIN (GOMME-LAQUE)

F.4 LACCIFER IACCA (COCCIDAE)

Shellac is a resin secreted by the female lac bug, on trees in the forests of India and Thailand. It has been used as dyestuff since it was traded in the East Indies in the 13th Century. Venice, Italy used shellac to color many of its buildings.

FLAX LINEN

Grown: Canada

F.5 LINUM USITATISSIMUM (LINACAEAE)

Flax fibers are taken from the stem of the plant and are two to three times as strong as those of cotton. Europe and North America depended on flax for vegetable-based cloth until the 19th century when cotton overtook flax as the most common plant used for making clothing. The plant is highly-renewable and requires no chemicals to cultivate or process.

MADDER ROOT

F.6 RUBIA TINCTORUM (RUBIACEAE)

Madder root is a herbaceous perennial plant species belonging to the bedstraw and coffee family. It has been used since ancient times as a red vegetable dye for leather, wool, cotton and silk.

POST-CONSUMER REPURPOSED COTTON T-SHIRTS

Sourced: United States

F.7 REDIVIVUS GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM (MALVACEAE)

Our USA-sourced recycled cotton is made from the waste of discarded American t-shirts. Recycling cotton requires a fraction of the amount of water needed to grow virgin cotton as well as less energy and no chemicals.

GMO-FREE ORGANIC COTTON

Grown: Odisha, India & Texas, United States

F.8 GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM (MALVACEAE)

The main benefit of organic materials is that the crops aren't treated with pesticides, insecticides, herbicides and Genetically Modified Organisms. These toxins are harmful for farmers and workers, us as consumers, and entire wildlife eco-systems.

CUTCH BARK

F.7 SENEGALIA CATECHU (MIMOSACAEA)

Cutch, an extract from heartwood, is used as an ingredient to give red color and typical flavor to paan, a traditional cooking paste. The dye ingredient is produced by boiling wood in water and evaporating the resulting brew.

MILK FROM FOOD WASTE

Sourced: Europe

F.8 GALACTOSE

Opponents of milk fiber contend that it takes away from the food supply. But it's actually created from a small portion of the millions of tons of milk deemed unsafe for human consumption in Europe. The textile has been around since the 1930’s and it uses fewer resources than almost all natural fibers. It only takes 2 liters of water to make a kilo of milk fiber.

EUCALPYTUS

Grown: Beaufort, South Africa & California, United States

F.7 EUCALYPTUS DEGLUPTA (MYRTACEAE)

Made from responsibly-sourced Eucalyptus & Pine trees from South Africa and California, respectively, this fiber is valuable because it is able to grow on low-grade land unusable for food production. The man-made fiber is created through the use of nano-technology in a closed-loop process that recovers or decomposes all of its solvents and emissions.

HEMP

Grown: Yunnan, China

F.8 CANNABIS SATIVA

This versatile fiber is fast-growing, requires very little water, is naturally pest-resistant and produces more fiber yield per acre than any other source. It is anti-bacterial, biodegradeable and resistant to mold, saltwater and ultraviolet light.